Working memory has more layers than thought

April, 2011

A new study provides further support for a three-tier model of working memory, where the core only holds one item, the next layer holds up to three, and further items can be passively held ready.

Readers of my books and articles will know that working memory is something I get quite excited about. It’s hard to understate the importance of working memory in our lives. Now a new study tells us that working memory is in fact made up of three areas: a core focusing on one active item, a surrounding area holding at least three more active items (called the outer store), and a wider region containing passive items that have been tagged for later retrieval. Moreover, the core region (the “focus of attention”) has three roles (one more than thought) — it not only directs attention to an item and retrieves it, but it also updates it later, if required.

In two experiments, 49 participants were presented with up to four types of colored shapes on a computer screen, with particular types (eg a red square) confined to a particular column. Each colored shape was displayed in sequence at the beginning with a number from 1 to 4, and then instances of the shapes appeared sequentially one by one. The participants’ task was to keep a count of each shape. Different sequences involved only one shape, or two, three, or four shapes. Participants controlled how quickly the shapes appeared.

Unsurprisingly, participants were slower and less accurate as the set size (number of shape types) increased. There was a significant jump in response time when the set-size increased from one to two, and a steady increase in RT and decline in accuracy as set-size increased from 2 to 4. Responses were also notably slower when the stimulus changed and they had to change their focus from one type of shape to another (this is called the switch cost). Moreover, this switch cost increased linearly with set-size, at a rate of about 240ms/item.

Without getting into all the ins and outs of this experiment and the ones leading up to it, what the findings all point to is a picture of working memory in which:

  • the focus contains only one item,
  • the area outside the focus contains up to three items,
  • this outer store has to be searched before the item can be retrieved,
  • more recent items in the outer store are not found any more quickly than older items in the outer store,
  • focus-switch costs increase as a direct function of the number of items in the outer store,
  • there is (as earlier theorized) a third level of working memory, containing passive items, that is quite separate from the two areas of active storage,
  • that the number of passive items does not influence either response time or accuracy for recalling active items.

It is still unclear whether the passive third layer is really a part of working memory, or part of long-term memory.

The findings do point to the need to use active loads rather than passive ones, when conducting experiments that manipulate cognitive load (for example, requiring subjects to frequently update items in working memory, rather than simply hold some items in memory while carrying out another task).

Reference: 

Related News

Using a large data set of 241 brain-lesion patients, researchers have mapped the location of each patient's lesion and correlated that with each patient's IQ score to produce a map of the brain regions that influence intelligence.

A study of 80 pairs of middle-income Canadian mothers and their year-old babies has revealed that children of mothers who answered their children's requests for help quickly and accurately; talked about their children's preferences, thoughts, and memories during play; and encouraged successful s

A study involving over 1000 older men and women (60-75) with type-2 diabetes has found that those with higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their blood are more likely to have experienced cognitive decline.

Mindfulness Training had a positive effect on both

A new study challenges the popular theory that expertise is simply a product of tens of thousands of hours of deliberate practice. Not that anyone is claiming that this practice isn’t necessary — but it may not be sufficient.

A study in which 60 young adult mice were trained on a series of maze exercises designed to challenge and improve their working memory ability (in terms of retaining and using current spatial information), has found that the mice improved their proficiency o

Visual

Pages

Subscribe to Latest newsSubscribe to Latest newsSubscribe to Latest health newsSubscribe to Latest news