Temporary cognitive impairment for many hospitalized seniors

May, 2011

Hospitalization can temporarily impair seniors’ cognitive function, and more support is needed. Discharge instructions should be given with this in mind.

A study involving 200 older adults (70+) experiencing a stay in hospital has found that at discharge nearly a third (31.5%) had previously unrecognized low cognitive function (scoring below 25 on the MMSE if high-school-educated, or below 18 if not). This impairment had disappeared a month later for more than half (58%).The findings are consistent with previous research showing a lack of comprehension of discharge instructions, often resulting in rehospitalization.

The findings demonstrate the effects of hospitalization on seniors, and point to the need for healthcare professionals and family to offer additional support. It’s suggested that patient self-management may be better taught as an outpatient following discharge rather than at the time of hospital discharge.

Sleep disruption and stress are presumed to be significant factors in why this occurs.

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