Memory impairment more common in people with a history of cancer

November, 2010

A very large study has found everyday memory problems among middle-aged and elderly are more likely in those with a history of cancer.

Confirming earlier indications from small studies, a very large nationwide survey has found that people who have had cancer are 40% more likely to experience memory problems that interfere with daily functioning.

The U.S. study involved nearly 10,000 people aged 40 and older, of whom 1,305 (13.3%) reported they had cancer or a history of cancer. Of these, 14% answered yes to the question "Are you limited in any way because of difficulty remembering or because you experience periods of confusion?" Of those who did not have a history of cancer, 8% answered yes to this question.

The degree to which these memory problems are related to the treatment or to the cancer itself (or even perhaps to the experience of having cancer) is one that needs further investigation, but the researcher suggests the finding points to memory issues being more common among cancer sufferers than realized, and recommends that cognitive assessment should be a standard part of cancer treatment.

The study is noteworthy in including all cancers, rather than focusing on one. Nevertheless, I hope that we eventually see a published paper (these results were presented at conference) that also analyses the data in terms of different cancers, different treatments, and length of time since the cancer.

Earlier reports on ‘chemobrain’, and possible ways to help

Reference: 

Results were presented at the Third AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities.

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