Healthy midlife diet may prevent dementia later

Data from the population-based Finnish Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Incidence of Dementia (CAIDE) study has revealed that healthy dietary choices in midlife may prevent dementia in later years. Out of 2,000 participants, 1,449 took part in the follow-up. The participants were 39 to 64 years old at baseline and 65 to 75 years old at follow-up.

Those who ate the healthiest diet at around age 50 had an almost 90% lower risk of dementia in a 14-year follow-up study than those whose diet was the least healthy.

Healthy foods included vegetables, berries and fruits, fish and unsaturated fats from milk products and spreads; unhealthy foods included sausages, eggs, sweets, sugary drinks, salty fish and saturated fats from milk products and spreads.

Consistent with other research, a high intake of saturated fats was also linked to poorer cognition and an increased risk of mild cognitive impairment 21 years later. A higher saturated fat intake was also associated with an increased risk of dementia among those carrying the “Alzheimer's gene”, ApoE4.

Those consuming 3 to 5 cups of coffee daily had a smaller risk of dementia than those consuming less or more.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-03/uoef-hmd031014.php

Reference: 

Eskelinen, Marjo: The effects of midlife diet on late-life cognition: an epidemiological approach. Publications of the University of Eastern Finland. Dissertations in Health Sciences., no 220. http://epublications.uef.fi/pub/urn_isbn_978-952-61-1394-4/

Eskelinen MH, Ngandu T, Helkala E-L, Tuomilehto J, Nissinen A, Soininen H, Kivipelto M. Fat intake at midlife and cognitive impairment later in life: a population-based CAIDE study. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry 23(7): 741, 2008.

Laitinen MH, Ngandu T, Rovio S, Helkala E-L, Uusitalo U, Viitanen M, Nissinen A, Tuomilehto J, Soininen H, Kivipelto M. Fat Intake at Midlife and Risk of Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease: A Population-Based Study. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 22(1): 99, 2006.

Eskelinen MH, Ngandu T, Tuomilehto J, Soininen H, Kivipelto M. Midlife Coffee and Tea Drinking and the Risk of Late-Life Dementia: A Population-based CAIDE Study. J Alzheimers Dis 16(1): 85-91, 2009.

Eskelinen MH, Ngandu T, Tuomilehto J, Soininen H, Kivipelto M. Midlife Healthy Diet Index and Late-Life Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease. Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Extra 1(1): 103-112, 2011.

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