Memory complaints linked to higher risk of MCI & dementia

Data from 6257 older adults (aged 55-90) evaluated from 2005-2012 has revealed that concerns about memory should be taken seriously, with subjective complaints associated with a doubled risk of developing mild cognitive impairment or dementia, and subjective complaints supported by a loved one being associated with a fourfold risk. Complaints by a loved one alone were also associated with a doubled risk. Among those with MCI, subjective complaints supported by a loved one were associated with a threefold risk of converting to dementia.

Of the 4414 initially cognitively normal, 14% developed MCI or dementia over the course of the study (around 5 years); of the 1843 with MCI, 41% progressed to dementia.

http://www.futurity.org/worry-about-memory-predicts-alzheimer%E2%80%99s-risk/

[3573] Gifford, K. A., Liu D., Lu Z., Tripodis Y., Cantwell N. G., Palmisano J., et al.
(2014).  The source of cognitive complaints predicts diagnostic conversion differentially among nondemented older adults.
Alzheimer's & Dementia. 10(3), 319 - 327.

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