Lifestyle Effects on Memory & Cognition

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A study and a recent review suggest that while iron is important for brain health and development, whether it’s beneficial or harmful depends on the other nutrients consumed with it.

A study involving 676 children (7-9) in rural Nepal has found that those whose mothers received iron, folic acid and vitamin A supplementation during their pregnancies and for three months after the birth performed better on some measures of intellectual and motor functioning compared to offspri

A small study suggests beet juice may improve blood flow in important regions of the brain in older adults.

Following on from previous studies showing that drinking beet juice can lower blood pressure, a study involving 14 older adults (average age 75) has found that after two days of eating a high-nitrate breakfast, which included 16 ounces of beet juice, blood flow to the

A hamster study indicates that chronic jet lag changes the brain in ways that cause long-lasting memory and learning problems.

Twice a week for four weeks, female hamsters were subjected to six-hour time shifts equivalent to a New York-to-Paris airplane flight.

A very large cross-country comparison of U.S. and European countries reveals a correlation between lower average scores on a simple memory test and higher rates of retirement among 60-64 year olds.

Do retired people tend to perform more poorly on cognitive tests than working people because you’re more likely to retire if your mental skills are starting to decline, or because retirement dulls the brain?

Walking helps older adults fight brain shrinkage, which is in turn associated with a reduced risk of cognitive impairment and dementia.

A long-running study involving 299 older adults (average age 78) has found that those who walked at least 72 blocks during a week of recorded activity (around six to nine miles) had greater gray matter volume nine years later.

A small study suggests that social activities are more tiring for extraverts than introverts, and that this personality trait may influence the effect of sleep loss on attention.

A study involving 48 healthy adults aged 18-39 has found that extraverts who were deprived of sleep for 22 hours after spending 12 hours in group activities performed worse on a vigilance task that did those extraverts who engaged in the same activities on their own in a private room.

New findings may help explain why heavy smokers find it so hard to give up, and even why heavy smokers are also so often heavy drinkers.

Comparison of the brains of 22 smokers and 21 people who have never smoked in their lives has revealed that the left medial

A new study suggests that the link between midlife obesity and cognitive impairment and dementia in old age may be explained by poorer insulin sensitivity.

Previous research has indicated that obesity in middle-age is linked to higher risk of cognitive decline and dementia in old age.

One precursor of age-related cognitive impairment and dementia is inflammation. Research suggests why that might be, and explains why the plant nutrient luteolin can help fight memory impairment.

Inflammation in the brain appears to be a key contributor to age-related memory problems, and it may be that this has to do with the dysregulation of micro

More evidence for the benefits of physical exercise for cognition, this time involving 9-10 year old children.

Brain imaging of 49 children aged 9-10 has found that those who were physically fit had a

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