Work-related stress a risk factor for diabetes

August, 2014

Data collected from more than 5,300 employed Germans aged 29-66 has revealed that, over 13 years, 291 developed type 2 diabetes. Those who were under a high level of pressure at work and also perceived themselves as having little control over their activities had about a 45% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those subjected to less workplace stress.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-08/hzm--wsi080814.php

Huth, C. et al. (2014), Job Strain as a Risk Factor for the Onset of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Findings From the MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study, Psychosomatic Medicine, 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000084

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