Cardiovascular health affected early in type 2 diabetes

July, 2017

A study involving 1,818 Hispanic Americans has confirmed that diabetes, whether controlled or not, is linked to worse measures of cardiac structure and function, and also shows that this happens very early in the development of diabetes.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-10/cums-gia102116.php

Demmer, R. T., Allison, M. A., Cai, J., Kaplan, R. C., Desai, A. A., Hurwitz, B. E., … Rodriguez, C. J. (2016). Association of Impaired Glucose Regulation and Insulin Resistance With Cardiac Structure and Function. Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, 9(10), e005032. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.116.005032 

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