Blue light can reduce blood pressure

One novel way to reduce blood pressure comes from a study that found that 30 minutes of whole-body blue light significantly reduced systolic blood pressure by almost 8 mmHg, similar to what is seen in clinical trials with blood pressure lowering drugs.

Exposure to blue light also reduced arterial stiffness, increased blood vessel relaxation, and increased levels of nitric oxide.

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-11/uos-blc110818.php

[4519] Stern, M., Broja M., Sansone R., Gröne M., Skene S. S., Liebmann J., et al.
(2018).  Blue light exposure decreases systolic blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and improves endothelial function in humans.
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. 25(17), 1875 - 1883.

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