Concussion not well understood, but widely feared

  • A survey of US adults suggests worry about concussion goes hand in hand with a lack of understanding.

An online national survey of 2,012 adult Americans (of whom 948 were parents) has found that, while the vast majority (87%) don’t know the definition of a concussion and many don’t know the injury is treatable, there is a high level of concern and even fear across the country.

  • 89% believe concussions are a moderate to severe health concern
  • 32% of parents live in fear that their child will get a concussion
  • 25% of parents do not let their kids play some contact sports because of fear of concussion
  • while 57% have personal experience with concussions, 26% did not see a health care professional when someone in their family had one
  • 37% admit that they are confused about what a concussion truly is
  • headaches, and dizziness/motion sensitivity are recognized as symptoms by 58%, and cognitive difficulty by 55%
  • only 34% recognize fatigue as a symptom, and only 13% recognize changes in mood as a symptom
  • 79% incorrectly believe or are unsure that there is no real way to cure a concussion; the symptoms can only be lessened
  • 81% aren’t comfortable that they would know how to manage or treat a concussion if they sustained one
  • only 49% know that a person doesn't need to stay awake for 24 hours after sustaining a concussion
  • only 25% understand that safety equipment—such as helmets or mouth guards—cannot prevent the majority of all concussions

http://www.futurity.org/concussions-fear-survey-1018432-2/

The full report can be downloaded at http://rethinkconcussions.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/harris-poll-report.pdf

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