Impaired recovery from inflammation linked to Alzheimer's

Analyses of cerebrospinal fluid from 15 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 20 patients with mild cognitive impairment, and 21 control subjects, plus brain tissue from some of them, has found that those with Alzheimer’s had lower levels of a particular molecule involved in resolving inflammation. These ‘specialized pro-resolving mediators’ regulate the tidying up of the damage done by inflammation and the release of growth factors that stimulate tissue repair. Lower levels of these molecules also correlated with a lower degree of cognitive function.

The pro-resolving molecules identified so far are derivatives of omega-3 fatty acids, providing support for the idea that dietary supplements of these may provide benefit.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-02/ki-irf021414.php

[3616] Wang, X., Zhu M., Hjorth E., Cortés-Toro V., Eyjolfsdottir H., Graff C., et al.
(2014).  Resolution of inflammation is altered in Alzheimer's disease.
Alzheimer's & Dementia.

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