Welcome to About Memory!

 

This site is primarily focused on reporting on cognitive and brain research, providing the evidence-based foundations for the articles on Mempowered, and my books.

For more user-friendly advice about improving your memory, or dealing with cognitive problems, go to my companion website Mempowered.

photo of Fiona McPherson Dr Fiona McPherson has written several books on memory & learning, including:

Successful Learning Simplified   NEW!

Perfect Memory Training

Planning to Remember

How to Learn

Effective Notetaking

Mnemonics for Study

Latest News

How memory works

The number of items a person can hold in short-term memory is strongly correlated with their IQ. But short-term memory has been recently found to vary along another dimension as well: some people remember (‘see’) the items in short-term memory more clearly and precisely than other people.

Posted: Tue, 9 December 2014

Problems

In 2013 I reported how a 3-second interruption while doing a task doubled the rate of sequence errors, while a 4s one tripled it. A new study has attempted to measure just how much ongoing interruptions can negatively affect the quality of a complex creative task.

Posted: Wed, 4 February 2015

Aging

A review of meditation research reported in January last year concluded that there were insufficient good studies to allow us to say that meditation clearly improves attention and cognition. Studies from 2014 suggest three factors that might be part of the reason for inconsistent research findings:

Posted: Mon, 9 February 2015

Alzheimers

Last year I reported on a finding that ten lipids in the blood could predict development of

Posted: Thu, 12 February 2015

Strategies

A review of meditation research reported in January last year concluded that there were insufficient good studies to allow us to say that meditation clearly improves attention and cognition. Studies from 2014 suggest three factors that might be part of the reason for inconsistent research findings:

Posted: Mon, 9 February 2015

Study

Three recent studies point to the impact of social media and multiple device use on learning and cognitive control.

Posted: Tue, 3 February 2015

Children

Several recent studies add to the evidence that physical fitness boosts cognitive processing in children.

Posted: Mon, 2 February 2015

Lifestyle

Three recent studies point to the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness for older adults wanting to prevent cognitive decline.

Posted: Tue, 3 February 2015

Latest news

Last year I reported on a finding that ten lipids in the blood could predict development of

A review of meditation research reported in January last year concluded that there were insufficient good studies to allow us to say that meditation clearly improves attention and cognition.

In 2013 I reported briefly on a pilot study showing that “super-agers” — those over 80 years old who have the brains and cognitive powers more typical of people decades younger — had an unusually large

In 2013 I reported how a 3-second interruption while doing a task doubled the rate of sequence errors, while a 4s one tripled it. A new study has attempted to measure just how much ongoing interruptions can negatively affect the quality of a complex creative task.

Three recent studies point to the impact of social media and multiple device use on learning and cognitive control.

Three recent studies point to the importance of cardiorespiratory fitness for older adults wanting to prevent cognitive decline.

Several recent studies add to the evidence that physical fitness boosts cognitive processing in children.

Following a previous study linking higher maternal levels of two common chemicals with slower mental and motor development in preschoolers, a new study has found that this effect continues into school age.

A French study involving 36 healthy older adults (60-80), prescreened for amyloid deposits in the brain to exclude people who might have preclinical Alzheimer’s disease, has found a linear increase in

Data from 57,669 older Taiwanese patients (65+) with no dementia at the beginning of the 5-year study has found that the risk of developing dementia was inversely related to statin dosage.

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