Welcome to About Memory!


This site is primarily focused on reporting on cognitive and brain research, providing the evidence-based foundations for the articles on Mempowered, and my books.

For more user-friendly advice about improving your memory, or dealing with cognitive problems, go to my companion website Mempowered.


A study involving 382 older adults (average age 75) followed for around five years, has found that those who don’t get enough vitamin D may experience cognitive decline at a much faster rate than people who have adequate vitamin D.

Posted: Wed, 16 September 2015


A study involving both mice and human cells adds to evidence that stress is a risk factor for Alzheimer's.

Posted: Thu, 17 September 2015


Data from 23,572 Americans from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study has revealed that those who survived a stroke went on to have significantly faster rates of cognitive decline as they aged.

Posted: Wed, 16 September 2015

How memory works

Because this is such a persistent myth, I thought I should briefly report on this massive study that should hopefully put an end to this myth once and for all (I wish! Myths are not so easily squashed.)

Posted: Mon, 20 July 2015


Mindfulness meditation is associated with various positive benefits, one of which is improved attention, but it might not be all good. A new study suggests that it may have negative cognitive consequences.

Posted: Wed, 23 September 2015


A study involving 100 healthy older adults (aged 60-80) has found that those with higher levels of physical activity showed more variable spontaneous brain activity in certain brain regions (including the

Posted: Tue, 1 September 2015


A small study that compared teaching Spanish-speaking children English vocabulary using a song or a spoken poem has found definite and long-term advantages to the song form.

Posted: Wed, 19 August 2015


A study involving 845 secondary school students has revealed that each hour per day spent watching TV, using the internet or playing computer games at average age 14.5 years was associated with poorer GCSE grades at age 16.

Posted: Mon, 21 September 2015