Welcome to About Memory!

 

This site is primarily focused on reporting on cognitive and brain research, providing the evidence-based foundations for the articles on Mempowered, and my books.

For more user-friendly advice about improving your memory, or dealing with cognitive problems, go to my companion website Mempowered.

Aging

A study involving 100 older adults (aged 80-99) with hearing loss has found that those who used a hearing aid performed significantly better on a cognitive test (MMSE) than those who didn't use a hearing aid, despite having poorer hearing.

Posted: Thu, 12 May 2016

Alzheimers

Data from 876 patients (average age 78) in the 30-year Cardiovascular Health Study show that virtually any type of aerobic physical activity can improve brain volume and reduce Alzheimer's risk.

Posted: Thu, 12 May 2016

Problems

Can you help protect yourself from the memory of traumatic events? A new study suggests that, by concentrating on concrete details as you live through the event, you can reduce the number of intrusive memories later experienced.

Posted: Thu, 12 May 2016

How memory works

We've all done it: used the wrong name when we know the right one perfectly well. And we all know when it's most likely to happen. But here's a study come to reassure us that it's okay, this is just how we roll.

Posted: Fri, 13 May 2016

Strategies

A couple of studies reported at the recent Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society are intriguing.

Posted: Thu, 12 May 2016

Lifestyle

A small study involving 50 younger adults (18-35; average age 24) has found that those with a higher BMI performed significantly worse on a computerised memory test called the “Treasure Hunt Task”.

Posted: Thu, 12 May 2016

Study

Four studies involving a total of more than 300 younger adults (20-24) have looked at information processing on different forms of media.

Posted: Tue, 17 May 2016

Children

I've reported before on studies showing how gesturing can help children with mathematics and problem-solving. A new Australian study involving children aged 9-13 has found that finger-tracing has a similar effect.

Posted: Fri, 13 May 2016